In Brief

Residents impacted by Ida get state, federal tax filing extensions

By: - September 9, 2021 6:58 am

The new timeline applies to relief workers, businesses, and individuals in areas affected by the storm. (Daniella Heminghaus for New Jersey Monitor)

New Jerseyans affected by last week’s Ida-related storms will get some leeway on their tax filings, State Treasurer Liz Muoio announced Wednesday.

The Division of Taxation will allow filers to submit tax returns and payments due between Aug. 26 and Jan. 3, 2022, on the later date. That includes quarterly estimated income tax payments due later this month.

The new timeline applies to relief workers, businesses, and individuals in areas affected by the storm, and those whose tax documents were held in regions hit by Ida.

Residents who received a valid extension on their 2020 tax returns don’t have to file until Jan. 3, and penalties and interest on underpaid taxes may be waived.

The state advised residents filing returns electronically to wait until they receive a notice from the division that will allow them to tell the state they were impacted by the storm and request a later filing date.

Individuals filing hard copies should write “Presidential Disaster Relief Area, Hurricane Ida” in black ink at the top of their documents, the division said.

New Jersey’s delay is virtually identical to one announced last week by the Internal Revenue Service, which is also allowing impacted individuals to defer tax payments until next January.

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Nikita Biryukov
Nikita Biryukov

Nikita Biryukov most recently covered state government and politics for the New Jersey Globe. His tenure there included revelatory stories on marijuana legalization, voting reform and Rep. Jeff Van Drew's decamp to the Republican Party. Earlier, he worked as a freelancer for The Home News Tribune and The Press of Atlantic City.

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